Welcome to the New WordPress.com and WordPress.com App for Mac

Big OSS release today as Automattic open-sources new WP.com front-end!

The WordPress.com Blog

What if WordPress.com helped you…

… update your pages and respond to comments from a desktop app?
… manage all your WordPress blogs and sites in one spot, on any device?
… spend less time on administration and uploading and more time creating?
… find the best content people publish with WordPress every day?

What if we rebuilt WordPress.com from the ground up to make it all possible?

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Welcome to the new WordPress.com. We can’t wait to see what you create.

Your home on the web has a home in your dock

You’ve already been using parts of the new WordPress.com, in the new editor, improved stats pages, and refreshed Reader. You deserve web tools as powerful and flexible as your ideas.

The WordPress.com for Mac app is the next step in a suite of improvements that help you realize your vision on the web — and it’s an app you already know how to…

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Jetpack 2.9.3: Critical Security Update

Public Service Announcement: please update your Jetpack!

Jetpack — Essential Security & Performance for WordPress

Jetpack version 2.9.3 contains a critical security update, and you should update your site and any you help manage as soon as possible.  You can update through your dashboard, or download Jetpack manually here .

During an internal security audit, we found a bug that allows an attacker to bypass a site’s access controls and publish posts. This vulnerability could be combined with other attacks to escalate access. This bug has existed since Jetpack 1.9, released in October 2012.

Fortunately, we have no evidence of this being used in the wild. However, now that this update is public, it’s just a matter of time before exploits occur. To avoid a breach, you should update your site as soon as possible. (The vulnerability has been disclosed on the MITRE Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures system as CVE-2014-0173.)

This is a bad bug, and Jetpack is one of the most widely used plugins…

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The Pixar Theory

It was Earth all along! *shakes fist*

Jon Negroni

pixar theory

Every Pixar movie is connected. I explain how, and possibly why.

In 2012, I watched a video on Cracked.com that introduced the idea (at least to me) that all of the Pixar movies actually exist within the same universe. Since then, I’ve obsessed over this concept, working to complete what I call The Pixar Theory, a working narrative that ties all of the Pixar movies into one cohesive timeline with a main theme. Another, longer, title is “The Grand Unifying Theory of Pixar Movies.”

This theory covers every feature-length movie made by Pixar Animation Studios since 1995. They include:

  • Toy Story
  • A Bug’s Life
  • Toy Story 2
  • Monsters Inc.
  • Finding Nemo
  • The Incredibles
  • Cars
  • Ratatouille
  • Wall-E
  • Up
  • Toy Story 3
  • Cars 2
  • Brave
  • Monsters University
  • Inside Out (in Part 2)
  • The Good Dinosaur (in Part 3)
  • Finding Dory (in Part 4)
  • Cars 3, Coco, Incredibles 2, and Toy Story…

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Whoa, this a huge tablet!

BGR

Forget the battle between 7-inch and 10-inch tablets — Lenovo’s (0992) got something much bigger in mind. Per AllThingsD, Lenovo will show off its 27-inch IdeaCentre Horizon at the Consumer Electronics Show this week, a gigantic full HD multi-touch display that runs Windows 8 and features a third-generation Core i7 processor with NVIDIA GeForce graphics. The beast weighs in at 17 pounds, so it’s not exactly something you can carry with you to your local coffee shop, but if you want to convert your living room table into a massive computer, Lenovo’s table tablet is one of the only games in town. The price could be prohibitive to mass consumer adoption, however, as AllThingsD says the new computer will sell for around $1,700 when it ships this summer.

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Software patents drive me bonkers, but it’s an interesting thought: did Samsung just pay $1B to become the #2 device manufacturer? At the levels that these guys are playing at, that’s probably cheaper than authentically growing to that position.

It makes me wonder if Samsung intentionally crossed that line knowing that it’s costs, while steep, would ultimately be less expensive in the long run. Or are they just clumsy copycats that lucked out?

Gigaom

After Samsung’s stunning $1 billion defeat in court at the hands of Apple (s aapl), calling it a winner might seem awfully far-fetched. But that’s the argument some are making about the South Korean conglomerate.

In a blog post, Robert Scoble said while Samsung will take a big PR hit and lose $1 billion, it was worth it to copy Apple because it vaulted the company ahead of other smartphone rivals. Samsung also sells an array of products that Apple doesn’t and setting up the comparison with Apple worked out well for the entire company, Scoble said.

“It only cost $1 billion to become the #2 most profitable mobile company. Remember how much Microsoft (s msft) paid for Skype? $8 billion. So, for 1/8th of a Skype Samsung took RIM’s (s rimm) place and kicked HTC’s behind…I bet that RIM wishes it had copied the iPhone a lot sooner than…

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How the Rich Get Rich

Obvious conclusions:

  • Working for a salary won’t make you rich.
  • Neither will making only safe “income” investments.
  • Neither will investing only in large companies.
  • Owning a business or businesses, whether in part or partnership, could not only build a solid wealth foundation but could someday…
  • Generate a huge financial windfall.

Clearly, getting rich–in monetary terms–is the result of investing in yourself and others, taking risks, doing a lot of small things right… and then doing one big thing really, really right.

via How the Rich Get Rich | Inc.com.

I’m always been interested in quantitative analysis of things most folks “just have a gut feeling for.” For instance, how many folks have run the numbers on why certain folks are rich and certain folks are poor? Maybe we don’t have all the answers, but insight into some of the causes provides valuable insight into the way things work. For instance, it’s easy to see why there are many affluent people in America: a culture of entrepreneurship encourages people to takes risks until they do their one big thing “really, really right.”